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Summary PDF: What are the best strategies for emergency preparedness and emergency information dissemination among resettled refugees?

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What are the best strategies for emergency preparedness and emergency information dissemination among resettled refugees?

The evidence in this area is suggestive. Within these suggestive studies, there is broad consensus on four key points related to emergency preparedness and emergency information dissemination among resettled refugees:

  • Pre-existing partnerships among refugee communities, community-based organizations (CBOs), and local emergency planners are vital.
  • People who serve as social bridges between refugee communities and governmental and community-based organizations are important conduits for emergency information dissemination.
  • Emergency messaging must be simple and consistent, delivered in refugees’ native languages and made available through multiple communication channels.
  • Refugees may meet disasters with resiliency.

 

Given the ethical and logistical challenges of conducting impact evaluation studies in disasters, the recommendations of these suggestive studies should be viewed as best practices at this time.

Post TitleStrength of EvidenceType of StudyDirection of Evidence
Emergency Preparedness: Knowledge and Perceptions of Latin American ImmigrantsSuggestiveSuggestive evidenceNo evidence about impact
Promoting Community Preparedness and Resilience: A Latino Immigrant Community-Driven Project Following Hurricane SandySuggestiveSuggestive evidencePositive impact
Developing a Disaster Preparedness Campaign Targeting Low-Income Latino Immigrants: Focus Group Results for Project PREPSuggestiveSuggestive evidenceNo evidence about impact
Medical Interpreters and Bilingual School Staff: Potential Disaster Information Conduits?SuggestiveSuggestive evidenceNo evidence about impact
Integrating Immigrant Families in Emergency Response, Relief, and Rebuilding EffortsSuggestiveSuggestive evidencePositive impact
Responding to a Mumps Outbreak Impacting Immigrants and Low-English-Proficiency PopulationsSuggestiveSuggestive evidencePositive impact
Global Learning Experiences During a Domestic Community Health ClinicalSuggestiveSuggestive evidenceNo evidence about impact
The Canterbury Earthquakes and Refugee CommunitiesSuggestiveSuggestive evidenceNo evidence about impact
Young People from Refugee Backgrounds as a Resource for Disaster Risk ReductionSuggestiveSuggestive evidenceNo evidence about impact
Filling the Gaps: Inequitable Emergency Preparedness and Disaster Relief Policies Serving Immigrant and Refugee CommunitiesSuggestiveSuggestive evidenceNo evidence about impact
Stigma, Health Disparities, and the 2009 H1N1 Influenza Pandemic: How to Protect Latino Farmworkers in Future Health EmergenciesSuggestiveSuggestive evidenceNo evidence about impact
Pandemic Influenza Preparedness and Response Among Immigrants and RefugeesSuggestiveSuggestive evidenceNo evidence about impact
Best Practice Guidelines Engaging with Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) Communities in Times of DisasterSuggestiveSuggestive evidenceNo evidence about impact
A Bosnian Refugee Community’s Hidden Capacity in Preparation for a Natural Disaster in the United StatesSuggestiveSuggestive evidenceNo evidence about impact

Studies included in the database focused on high-income or upper middle-income countries, including but not limited to the United States. Studies included must have been published since 2000. To identify evidence related to emergency preparedness among refugees, we searched the following websites and databases using the following population, methodology, and target problem terms:

Websites and Databases Population Terms Methodology Terms Target Problem Terms
Campbell Collaboration
Cochrane Collaboration
Mathematica Policy Research
Evidence Aid
Urban Institute
Migration Policy Institute
HHS OPRE
Medline
ASSIA
Social Services Abstracts
Social Work Abstracts
ReliefWeb
ALNAP
refugee
OR
immigrant
OR
“unaccompanied minor”
OR
asylee
OR
“temporary protected status”
OR
“victims of traffick*”
OR
“traffick*victims”
OR
T-Visa
OR
U-Visa
OR
Cuban
OR
Haitian
OR
Amerasian
evaluation
OR
impact
OR
program
OR
intervention
OR
policy
OR Project
OR
train*
OR
therapy
OR
treatment
OR
counseling
OR
workshop
OR
review
OR
meta-analysis
OR
synthesis
“disaster prepared*”
OR
“emergency prepared*”
OR
pandemic

For databases or websites that permitted only basic searches, free-text terms and limited term combinations were selected out of the lists above, and all resultant studies were reviewed for relevance. Conversely, for databases or websites with advanced search capability, we made use of relevant filters available. All search terms were searched in the title and abstract fields only in order to exclude studies that made only passing mention of the topic under consideration.

After initial screening, Switchboard evidence mapping is prioritized as follows:First priority is given to meta-analyses and systematic reviews, followed by individual impact evaluations when no meta-analyses or systematic reviews are available. Evaluations that are rated as impact evidence are considered before those rated as suggestive, with the latter only being included for outcomes where no evidence is available from the former. As noted earlier, for the present topic of refugee emergency preparedness, no meta-analyses, systematic reviews, or impact evaluations were available; thus,suggestive studies were included